Build Mental Resilience

5 Ways to Toughen Up and Build Mental Resilience

Jen Roberts Leadership, Management, Stress

Truth: stress and adversity can pop up anywhere, any time. Just when you think you have it all under control when–BAM!–you get hit with something that derails your best intentions and sends you into a tailspin. You got up early and are walking out the door on time and ready for your day, then you spill your coffee on your lap in the car. You spent the week preparing for a big presentation at work and are ready to rock their socks off. At 9am the meeting gets pushed out for 3 more days! Seriously?! You get the drift… Things change, pressure exists, stuff happens. What you do with that pressure and how to move forward are the keys to success. Why is it that things seem so easy for some people? They go about their daily lives seemingly without a worry, while others around them struggle and muddle through …

leadership autopilot

Are You on Leadership Autopilot?

Jen Roberts Engagement, Leadership, Productivity

How much of your day do you actually spend engaged in leading others? Most leaders say things like, “I give 110%,” or “I can’t work any harder than I already do,” and even, “I put out fires all day. Then I do my work.” Sound about right? When you think back to your first leadership role what did leadership mean to you? What did you envision for yourself and the people you’d be leading? What kind of impact did you imagine your leadership would have on not just the individuals you lead, but the entire organizational culture? Actually, many people haven’t put much thought into these types of philosophical questions about leadership.  For most workers, assuming a leadership role (or management/supervisory if you must) is just the next logical step in their career; a reward for their hard work and success. Perhaps you imagined having people who could help do all the work; a team that …

Why Multitasking is a Myth

Jen Roberts Productivity

Think you’re good at multitasking? Think again! Most people feel that they have so much to accomplish there simply never seems to be enough time in the day. So, how do we typically handle that? Trying to do 8 things at once (AKA Multitasking). I’ve heard many leaders tell me how great they are at multitasking. They’re convinced that this is the only way to accomplish all their myriad demands in the span of the workday. The thing is, I coach leaders on this type of behavior all the time. I’ve even heard job applicants brag that one of their strengths is multitasking. The reality is, we don’t multitask very well. Research on divided attention shows that it’s not technically possible to do more than one thing at a time and get great results but we continue to try. Here’s an example conversation that might sound like some of yours. …

leadership actions

Leadership Actions Speak Louder than Words

Jen Roberts Leadership, Management

You’ve probably heard the phrase “consistent action leads to consistent results,” which makes logical sense. The more important, and perhaps unspoken, truth in this statement is that the quality of our results depends not on merely doing something, but on taking intentional action that fits our end goal. In other words, you get out of something what you put into it. Consistency, or lack thereof, can be the defining factor between failure or success. If you have children (or know anyone who does) you’re probably aware of the importance of consistency. Children learn how to behave through reinforcement and punishment and also through observation. To feel secure, children need parents to be consistent with them and are trusted not to send conflicting or confusing messages. Consistency as a parent can be difficult and exhausting, but it is of paramount importance. The same is true in business. One of the most …

saying no

The Courageous Power of Saying No

Jen Roberts Communication, Leadership

Many people struggle with saying no for a number of reasons. Thinking you have no choice, wanting to please others, or fearing you’ll be seen as uncooperative are among the many reasons you may feel uncomfortable saying no.

employees

5 Clues Your Employees Aren’t Buying In

Jen Roberts Engagement, Leadership

We all have things we’re “supposed” to do. Sometimes we want to do them, sometimes we don’t. This is just a fact of life. In the workplace, we label these as tasks or objectives. The basic premise is the same, however. Employees are either engaged and bought-in to completing these tasks to the best of their ability or they’re not. Have you really ever stopped to think about what holds people back from being completely engaged in a task or activity? When it comes to engagement and buy-in, there are four main approaches to work: 1) Resistant to engaging The employee won’t take positive action. Maybe they don’t feel like it’s worth it, or they’ve tried before and failed. The chance of success is low. 2) Engaged, but through effort or force The employee is enthusiastic about the activity, but they feel unprepared somehow to effectively complete the work. Success …

Kill Engagement

[VIDEO] 5 Leadership Behaviors That Kill Engagement on Your Team

Jen Roberts Engagement, Leadership

This article originally appeared on Forbes.com. As a leader, what do you expect from your direct reports? Most leaders want employees who take the initiative, get involved, make decisions and generate ideas. In fact, because your team is likely made up of educated, competent, seasoned employees (some of whom you may have hand selected), it’s natural to expect that they would need little direction to take the proverbial ball and run with it. You have a vested interest in their success because, when your team performs well, everyone wins. Likewise, employees of all generations share a desire to work autonomously toward the communicated vision. No one wants to feel as if they’re operating under someone else’s thumb, especially team members who are smart, ambitious and motivated. If autonomy is an essential ingredient for promoting employee engagement and motivation, and given that both leaders and employees desire empowered environments, what keeps leaders from encouraging …

Evolved or old-school

Are You Evolved or Old-School? 5 Questions for Leaders

Jen Roberts Engagement, Leadership

Ever wonder how you’re “aging” in your corporate environment? How do your employees see you as a leader? You probably don’t want to consider yourself an “old-school” leader. To most, that makes it sound like you’re behind the times, inflexible, or stuck in a rut. Most leaders I work with want to be seen as creative, supportive and innovative, and most of them are just that. Some people, though, might be sending the wrong signals that can turn off their employees. The most successful leaders are adaptable, and able to flex with the changing times. With today’s speed of business it can sometimes be difficult to keep up with all of the emerging trends and technology, not to mention the generational differences in the workforce. Tweet: The most successful leaders are adaptable, and able to flex with the changing times. Don’t think that sounds like you? Well, here’s a quick …